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DCNR Natural Gas Impacts Mapping Analysis

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State Forest in Northcentral PA Loading image. Please wait
Slide 1: State Forest Land in North Central Pennsylvania
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Slide 1: State Forest Land in North Central Pennsylvania
Slide 2: State Forest Land in North Central Pennsylvania: Mission Statement
Slide 3: Maintaining the Forest’s Ecological Integrity Overview
Slide 4: Maintaining the Forest’s Ecological Integrity within the Marcellus Shale Region
Slide 5: Maintaining the Forest’s Ecological Integrity
DCNR Gas Leases (dark blue)
Slide 6: Maintaining the Forest’s Ecological Integrity
Severed RIghts (light blue) — Subject to gas leasing by private owners
Slide 7: Maintaining the Forest’s Ecological Integrity
Ecologically sensitive areas due to species of concern (red) — Inappropriate for gas development
Slide 8: Maintaining the Forest’s Ecological Integrity
Ecologically sensitive areas due to unique areas (red) — Inappropriate for gas development
Slide 9: Maintaining the Forest’s Ecological Integrity
Ecologically sensitive areas due to road, trail and stream buffers (red) — Inappropriate for gas development
Slide 10: Maintaining the Forest’s Ecological Integrity
Inaccessible without damaging sensitive areas (green) — Inappropriate for gas development
Slide 11: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character Overview
Slide 12: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character
Pennsylvania contains some on the most remote and wild forest in the mid Atlantic region. The largest and most remote areas are found in the Marcellus Shale formation.
Slide 13: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character
DCNR Gas Leases (dark blue) and Severed RIghts (light blue; subject to gas leasing by private owners)
Slide 14: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character
Primitive, undeveloped areas (red) — DCNR designated as off-limits for drilling because they provide peace, solitude, remoteness, and backland experiences
Slide 15: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character
Semi-Primitive Areas (orange) — Moderately remote, but contribute to wild characteristics of forest
Gas development will shrink/destroy nearby/adjacent Primitive areas.
Slide 16: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character
Semi-developed (dark green) — Gas development in these areas will shrink/destroy nearby Primitive and Semi-Primitive areas.
Slide 17: Impacts of Gas Drilling on the Forest’s Wild Character
The next series of slides will model impacts of gas drilling on the area noted in the purple circle.
Slide 18: Topography
Tioga State Forest, Northcentral Pennsylvania
Slide 19: New Well Pad Locations
Fifty-four (54) new well pads could be developed within the next 5 – 10 years in this 65,000 acre (approx.) landscape view. Estimated well pads shown as blue diamonds
Slide 20: Wild Character Before Well Pads
Today’s Wild Character overlaid: Primitive (red), Semi-Primitive (orange), Semi-Developed (green)
Slide 21: New Access Roads Required
New Roads Required to Access Well Pads (light blue)
Slide 22: Forest’s Wild Character with new Well Pads
Future Wild Character as a result of new roads for gas development — Primitive (red); Semi-Primitive (orange); Semi-Developed (green)
Slide 23: Impact on the Forest’s Wild Character
Change to the wild character as a result of gas development. Today (current) overlaid with dashed lines. Significant decreases in Primitive (red) and Semi-Primitive (orange) observed; dramatic increase in Semi-Developed (green) areas
Slide 24: Impact on the Forest’s Wild Character
The only two remaining Primitive (red) areas: Pine Creek Gorge and Reynolds Spring. Reynolds Spring Area could have been destroyed by the roads and well pads because a narrow strip is all that holds it together.
Slide 25: Change in the Forest’s Wild Character
‘Before’ and ‘After’ Pie Chart Summary of 54 well pads
Slide 26: Change in the Forest’s Wild Character
In sum, Additional Natural Gas Development Involving Surface Disturbance would Significantly Damage the Wild Character of the State Forest
Slide 27: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character: Private Land Impacts
Gas Development on surrounding private lands also has a lasting impact on the State Forest’s wild character
Slide 28: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character: Private Land Impacts
Red diamonds indicate 2008 Marcellus well permits
Slide 29: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character: Private Land Impacts
Blue diamonds indicate 2009 Marcellus well permits
Slide 30: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character: Private Land Impacts
Purple diamonds indicate 2010 Marcellus well permits
Slide 31: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character: Private Land Impacts
Brown lines show major pipelines. Marcellus Shale permit activity is forming a pattern concentrated around existing pipeline infrastructure
Slide 32: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character: Private Land Impacts
Gas development on private land is already surrounding the State Forest in some areas, causing an uncompensated, lasting change on the Forest’s wild character.
Slide 33: Maintaining the Forest’s Wild Character: Private Land Impacts
Adding Marcellus well permits on State Forest Land (orange) helps depict cumulative impacts from well development on both public and private lands.
Slide 34: The Nature Conservancy – Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Priority Forest Patches
A joint effort by The Nature Conservancy and The Western Pennsylvania Conservancy evaluated contiguous patches of forestland in the Commonwealth. The results identify high-quality patches of large, intact forests and their supporting landscapes in the Marcellus Shale Region.
Slide 35: The Nature Conservancy – Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Priority Forest Patches
Much of the State Forest System has already been leased (dark blue). DCNR does not own the mineral rights to 15% of the state forest lands (light blue); these areas are subject to natural gas development by the private owners of the subsurface rights.
Slide 36: The Nature Conservancy – Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Priority Forest Patches
TNC-WPC Priority Forest patches identified by Forest Conservation Analysis (red); these areas are not appropriate for natural gas development.
Slide 37: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
Cumulative Impacts involve all four elements: Existing leases and severed rights, Impacts on the forest’s wild character, the forests’ ecological integrity, and TNC-WPC identified Forest Patches
Slide 38: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
Baseline of State Forest in Northcentral Pennsylvania
Slide 39: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
DCNR Gas Leases (dark blue)
Slide 40: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
Severed Rights (light blue)
Slide 41: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
Ecologically Sensitive Areas (red)
Slide 42: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
Primitive Areas added (red)
Slide 43: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
TNC-WPC Forest Patches added (red)
Slide 44: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
Impacts from surrounding private lands (black diamonds; existing 2008–2010 permits only) and pipelines (brown lines)
Slide 45: Cumulative Assessment and Impacts
... and we are left with small, fragmented areas (green) that are not accessible for gas development without crossing or further damaging the forest’s wild character and ecological integrity
Slide 46: Conclusion
There are ZERO State Forest acres suitable for gas leasing involving surface disturbance

 

Slideshow developed from DCNR’s Natural Gas Impacts Mapping Analysis (2010). Author. Retrieved as 7.04MB PDF November 2010 from www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/marcellus/moratorium.html